HomeControversyBeyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance’s Release May Be Derailed By Kelis’ Songwriting Credit

Since Beyoncé hasn’t previewed an album in years, there has been a frenzy of behind-the-scenes reports and conjecture on the collaborators, genre, themes, and Beyoncé’s creative process. The biggest megastar in music altered everything when she revealed Renaissance more than a month before its midnight release.

Some press reports during that period claimed that the Queen was working to produce her most socially conscious album to date, not necessarily in terms of content but rather in terms of actual production, all in keeping with the album’s ethos of acceptance, self-love, and letting inhibitions go on the dance floor.

She put all of her collaborators through #MeToo checks as part of the process of creating a morally repugnant album, which apparently caused her to decline working with some prominent musicians. The news of these checks comes in the wake of claims against Detail, the co-writer of “Drunk in Love,” which appeared on Beyonce’s self-titled album from 2013, who was charged with sexual and violent offenses in 2020.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

However, it appears like Beyoncé made a significant error in her quest for a more socially conscious production. The singer/rapper-turned-chef Kelis revealed a few days before the album’s release that no one in Beyoncé’s camp had asked her for permission to use an interpolation of her 2003 hit “Milkshake” in the Renaissance song “Energy.” Outraged, Kelis revealed in the comments on a fan Instagram account that she found out about the song’s use the same way the rest of the world did, claiming the “utter ignorance” of all three parties

Kelis, who became one of the most important female voices in early 2000s hip-hop with hits like “Bossy,” “Milkshake,” and “I Hate You So Much Right Now,” has long been outspoken about being a victim of manipulation by powerful males in the music business.

She has said that her ex-husband, rapper Nas, has physically and psychologically abused her. She has spoken out about how The Neptunes defrauded her of ownership of the masters and composition credits for her own songs, just listing her as a performer, in professional publications.

While Williams and Hugo are being paid directly for the Beyoncé track, Kelis appears to receive no payment because interpolations of songs involve replaying bits rather than using the actual recording, which would necessitate paying performers if a sample were used.

According to Jessica Hopper, the creator and director of the docuseries Women Who Rock, the music industry has long engaged in the practice of exploiting young artists, particularly female artists and, to a greater extent, Black female artists.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

“People have really turned this into Kelis vs. Beyoncé because it’s Beyoncé, and she’s rightfully a genius [who has] really revolutionized popular music again and again,” says Hopper. This is not a new narrative about Kelis or her career; she has always been honest.

This is truly about something that has a lot longer history for Black women, especially as singers and songwriters, when we simplify this to Kelis vs. Beyoncé and people saying Kelis should just be pleased that Beyoncé even credited her.

ALSO READ: Killstar Controversy: Is Killstar Fast Fashion, Sustainable, Or Ethical? 

I’m not sure how far this goes considering Drake, who was flagged for potentially grooming young stars, contributed to the album’s “Heated,” but how is it that Beyoncé went through extensive checks to ensure she didn’t passively condone abuse by working with any alleged or clearly abusive musicians, but didn’t have the foresight to anticipate how a highly influential female voice in hip-hop would react to the continuation of a decades-long trend of her exploita It casts a depressing shadow over what is undoubtedly a career-high album. The lack of nuance in the public’s reaction to Kelis’s displeasure may be even more discouraging.

Hopper bemoans, “All of these people who love Beyoncé because she is at the forefront of pop music, is brave, strong, and tells the truth, and places a lot of emphasis on Black women in her work. I genuinely want all of those folks to see and value that in Kelis’s efforts, struggles, and honesty.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

Kelis, did Beyoncé owe him a call? A dialogue between two artists as a gesture of respect? Of sure, I say. But is Beyoncé mostly to blame for this issue? Without a doubt. Kelis’ mistreatment has a long and storied history; she has never hidden it, but, as she asserts on her Instagram, she is no longer ready to be complacent about it.

ALSO READ: Backstreet Rookie Controversy: 6000+ Complaints Against Ji Chang Wook & Kim Yoo Jung Film 

Beyond that, the industry—and The Neptunes—owe a lot of reparations to one of hip-most hop’s significant voices. Beyoncé could do her bit by giving her a credit on “Energy,” but that is only the beginning.

Even Kelis thinks that Beyoncé isn’t to blame for the entire problem, despite how much she can make up for it. Also, I apologize, but another Black woman cannot always be relied upon to clean up after others. This is what the patriarchy and pop desire, according to Hopper, to push women against one another. because there is only room for one.

As she always does, Kelis will recount her experience of being mistreated by her label and the wider industry on the forthcoming Women Who Rock episode airing on Sunday. Maybe if we actually listen, we’ll discover that it always has been greater than Beyoncé.

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Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance’s Release May Be Derailed By Kelis’ Songwriting Credit

Since Beyoncé hasn’t previewed an album in years, there has been a frenzy of behind-the-scenes reports and conjecture on the collaborators, genre, themes, and Beyoncé’s creative process. The biggest megastar in music altered everything when she revealed Renaissance more than a month before its midnight release.

Some press reports during that period claimed that the Queen was working to produce her most socially conscious album to date, not necessarily in terms of content but rather in terms of actual production, all in keeping with the album’s ethos of acceptance, self-love, and letting inhibitions go on the dance floor.

She put all of her collaborators through #MeToo checks as part of the process of creating a morally repugnant album, which apparently caused her to decline working with some prominent musicians. The news of these checks comes in the wake of claims against Detail, the co-writer of “Drunk in Love,” which appeared on Beyonce’s self-titled album from 2013, who was charged with sexual and violent offenses in 2020.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

However, it appears like Beyoncé made a significant error in her quest for a more socially conscious production. The singer/rapper-turned-chef Kelis revealed a few days before the album’s release that no one in Beyoncé’s camp had asked her for permission to use an interpolation of her 2003 hit “Milkshake” in the Renaissance song “Energy.” Outraged, Kelis revealed in the comments on a fan Instagram account that she found out about the song’s use the same way the rest of the world did, claiming the “utter ignorance” of all three parties

Kelis, who became one of the most important female voices in early 2000s hip-hop with hits like “Bossy,” “Milkshake,” and “I Hate You So Much Right Now,” has long been outspoken about being a victim of manipulation by powerful males in the music business.

She has said that her ex-husband, rapper Nas, has physically and psychologically abused her. She has spoken out about how The Neptunes defrauded her of ownership of the masters and composition credits for her own songs, just listing her as a performer, in professional publications.

While Williams and Hugo are being paid directly for the Beyoncé track, Kelis appears to receive no payment because interpolations of songs involve replaying bits rather than using the actual recording, which would necessitate paying performers if a sample were used.

According to Jessica Hopper, the creator and director of the docuseries Women Who Rock, the music industry has long engaged in the practice of exploiting young artists, particularly female artists and, to a greater extent, Black female artists.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

“People have really turned this into Kelis vs. Beyoncé because it’s Beyoncé, and she’s rightfully a genius [who has] really revolutionized popular music again and again,” says Hopper. This is not a new narrative about Kelis or her career; she has always been honest.

This is truly about something that has a lot longer history for Black women, especially as singers and songwriters, when we simplify this to Kelis vs. Beyoncé and people saying Kelis should just be pleased that Beyoncé even credited her.

ALSO READ: Killstar Controversy: Is Killstar Fast Fashion, Sustainable, Or Ethical? 

I’m not sure how far this goes considering Drake, who was flagged for potentially grooming young stars, contributed to the album’s “Heated,” but how is it that Beyoncé went through extensive checks to ensure she didn’t passively condone abuse by working with any alleged or clearly abusive musicians, but didn’t have the foresight to anticipate how a highly influential female voice in hip-hop would react to the continuation of a decades-long trend of her exploita It casts a depressing shadow over what is undoubtedly a career-high album. The lack of nuance in the public’s reaction to Kelis’s displeasure may be even more discouraging.

Hopper bemoans, “All of these people who love Beyoncé because she is at the forefront of pop music, is brave, strong, and tells the truth, and places a lot of emphasis on Black women in her work. I genuinely want all of those folks to see and value that in Kelis’s efforts, struggles, and honesty.

Beyonce Album Controversy: Renaissance's Release May Be Derailed By Kelis' Songwriting Credit

Kelis, did Beyoncé owe him a call? A dialogue between two artists as a gesture of respect? Of sure, I say. But is Beyoncé mostly to blame for this issue? Without a doubt. Kelis’ mistreatment has a long and storied history; she has never hidden it, but, as she asserts on her Instagram, she is no longer ready to be complacent about it.

ALSO READ: Backstreet Rookie Controversy: 6000+ Complaints Against Ji Chang Wook & Kim Yoo Jung Film 

Beyond that, the industry—and The Neptunes—owe a lot of reparations to one of hip-most hop’s significant voices. Beyoncé could do her bit by giving her a credit on “Energy,” but that is only the beginning.

Even Kelis thinks that Beyoncé isn’t to blame for the entire problem, despite how much she can make up for it. Also, I apologize, but another Black woman cannot always be relied upon to clean up after others. This is what the patriarchy and pop desire, according to Hopper, to push women against one another. because there is only room for one.

As she always does, Kelis will recount her experience of being mistreated by her label and the wider industry on the forthcoming Women Who Rock episode airing on Sunday. Maybe if we actually listen, we’ll discover that it always has been greater than Beyoncé.

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

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